Help Us Translate WordPress.com

The WordPress.com Blog

When you’re with friends and family, you probably speak in your native language.

Here at WordPress.com, we think of all of you as our family, but we have yet to master all 105 languages into which WordPress.com is translated.

To address this, we’re happy to announce a major effort to improve the quality of our translations.

We’ve deployed a brand new tool, In-Page Translation, to allow you to participate more easily in the translation process — you’re part of the family, after all.

In-Page Translation Tool

Here’s how it works:

  1. On any WordPress.com dashboard screen or blog with its language set to something other than English, hover over your name and avatar on the Admin Bar.
  2. Click “Translate WordPress.com” link.
  3. A new sidebar with translation tools will appear on the left.
  4. Choose one of the rows, enter your translation, and hit “Submit.”
  5. Your suggestion is now sent to GlotPress.

Submitted translations will…

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Retrotechtacular: ROTOPARK is a Futuristic Parking Structure from 40 Years Ago

Hackaday

retrotechtacular-rotopark

Pictured above is a functioning model of an automated underground parking structure which was built and used, but obviously it never caught on widely. That makes us a bit sad, as it removes the need to find an empty parking spot every time you use the garage; and having a robot park your car for you seems very future-y.

The gist of the ROTOPARK system is a carousel and elevator system for parking cars. just drive into a single-stall garage at ground level, take your ticket, and walk out the people-hole. The garage stall floor is a sled which moves down an elevator (shown as blue stalls on the left half of the image) to be stored away in the rotating carousels of cars.

Obviously mechanical failure is a huge issue here. What if the elevator breaks? Also, at times of high traffic we think getting your vehicle back out of…

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Dual Port RAM Teaches an Old NES New Tricks

Hackaday

nesDPR

[Andrew] is developing a game for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). Emulators are great for this, but [Andy] loves running on the real iron. To help, he’s created a dual port RAM interface for his NES. As the name implies, a dual port RAM is a memory with two separate data and address buses. The Cypress Semiconductor CY7C136 [Andy] used also includes arbitration logic to ensure that both ports don’t attempt to access the same memory cell and cause data corruption. In [Andy’s] case the NES was on one side, oblivious to the new hardware. On the other side of the dual port RAM, [Andy] installed an ATmega164 running his own custom firmware.

The new hardware gives [Andy] a live view of what’s going on in the NES’s memory. He added a live memory view/edit screen similar to the FCEUX emulator. The window runs on a PC while the game itself is running…

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Tell Time and Blink an LED on Your Wrist with WatchDuino

Hackaday

Watchduino Open Source Watch

Is your hipster wrist having a hard time waiting for the debut of the iWatch? There’s a new open hardware/software project out that could help calm your nerves. The WatchDuino is exactly what it sounds like, an Arduino-based wrist watch.

The component list is short and inexpensive. The meat and potatoes consist of an ATMega328, crystal, Nokia LCD screen and LiPo battery. The USB-rechargeable battery lasts about a week before needing to be such. Besides presenting the Time and Date in both analog or digital formats (as you would expect) there is an alarm and timer. Additionally, there are 2 games, Pong and Snake. Any lack of features is made up for the fact that the software is open and can be modified and added to by the community. We’re sure the development of this watch will be quick and significant.

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Huge RGB Ring Light Clock

Hackaday

ring

After several months of work, [Greg] has completed one of the most polished LED clocks we’ve ever seen. It’s based on the WS2812 RGB LEDs, with an interesting PCB that allowed [Greg] to make a huge board without spending a lot of money.

The board is made of five interlocking segments, held together with the connections for power and data. Four of these boards contain only LEDs, but the fifth controller board is loaded up with an MSP430 microcontroller, a few capsense pads for a 1-D touch controller, and programming headers.

Finishing up the soldering, [Greg] had a beautiful LED ring light capable of being programmed as a clock, but no enclosure. A normal plastic case simply wouldn’t do, so [Greg] decided to try something he’d never done before: casting the PCB inside a block of resin.

A circular mold was made out of a piece of MDF and…

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Bomb Clock Scares You Awake!

Hackaday

Bomb Clock Scares You Awake

What better way to wake up then by fearing your impending explosion if you don’t hit the correct snooze combination! This is the DEVESTATOR (Translated), [Jacek’s] latest fun project, straight from Poland.

As an avid paintball and airsoft fan, [Jacek] wanted to build a unique clock — so he decided to make his own classic dynamite stick bomb… clock. He’s using a ATmega8 microcontroller at the heart of the project with both a DS1307 RTC and a DS1820 temperature sensor, because just for kicks, the clock also monitors ambient temperature!

To add to the realism of the project he also designed the PCB from scratch using Eagle CAD, which allowed him to make  the whole thing look even more threatening. To actually make the PCB he used the laminate thermal transfer method. The four buttons on the PCB allow you to scroll through the date, time, temperature, and set alarm…

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The Pyro Board: A Two Dimensional Ruben’s Tube

Hackaday

fire

Like visualizing music? Love fire? If so, you’re going to want to take a look at this Pyro Board.

What happens when you take a tube, put some holes along it, add a speaker on one end, pump some propane in, and then light it on fire? You get an awesome fire visual — also known as a Ruben’s Tube. It works because the sound pressure from the speakers causes the flow rate of gas leaving the holes to vary, which results in a visible “standing frequency” of flames, i.e. a flaming VU meter.

The folks over at [Fysikshow] decided to step it up a notch by building a 2-dimensional Ruben’s tube with 2500 holes. They have a steel box with the evenly spaced holes on the top, and two speakers attached to the sides. And it works amazingly well — see for yourself after the break.

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